A truck driver at work

For Employers: Getting the Most Out of Temporary Truck Drivers

Depending on your area of specialization, there are those moments when there is an increase in demand for your products. As good as this is for business, it can also be the most stressful time for employees due to the extra work. To deal with this, you can decide to hire seasonal stuff. The undertaking helps you meet the growing demand while not overworking your workers. The option offers flexibility as you can release the temporary workers once peak season is over. When looking for temporary truck drivers, consider the following tips:

Commence the Process Early

You already know the demands that come with the peak season. To get through it smoothly, put in place a hiring strategy and work within timelines. If you are working with the in-house human resource team, give them a schedule and hold them accountable. When hiring driver-leasing services, let them know what you want early enough and when you want it done.

You will want to conduct on the job evaluation by letting them behind the wheels so that you can review their performance. It will also be appropriate if they get an opportunity to shadow a regular driver to get the hang of the job. Getting the right match on time gives you enough freedom to train them and let them know the extent of their responsibilities within the duration of your engagement.

Cultivate a Healthy Work Environment

Toxic work environments breed unsatisfied and frustrated workers. A positive environment, on the other hand, yields job satisfaction and keeps employees happy. When you boost the working conditions of temporary workers, they will want to work with you later, and this will cut down on your training and orientation time. The employees will also do an excellent job despite knowing that they are only there for some time.

Build positive relations with the drivers, appreciate their hard work, and equip them with all the necessary information and materials they need to carry out their job diligently. Where appropriate, adjust truck cabs to accommodate their physical characteristics and boost their comfort. Once their tenure is over, and it is time for them to leave, have an off-boarding meeting so that you can learn what changes to make to improve their next experience.

Treat Them Like Regular Employees

A truck driver in his truck

When employees feel involved and appreciated, they work the best. The temporary drivers might be eager to get things done, but this does not mean that they will do a good job. When they have enough information on what is expected of them, the seasonal drivers and the company will get the most out of the temporary involvement. To get it right, take time to train, supervise, guide and offer feedback. You can achieve this by tracking them or reviewing their coverage charts. In case there are ongoing events during their short stay, do not leave them out.

Training is paramount to getting the best out of temporary truck drivers. You can only achieve this if you hire early enough to give you adequate time to do it comprehensively. Be realistic with the time they require to grasp their responsibilities and other associated obligations.